human resources – Orsatti http://orsatti.info/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 18:38:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://orsatti.info/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/icon-2022-01-16T201004.258-150x150.png human resources – Orsatti http://orsatti.info/ 32 32 Talent management requires diversity and transparency https://orsatti.info/talent-management-requires-diversity-and-transparency/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://orsatti.info/talent-management-requires-diversity-and-transparency/ The pile of files and resumes covered the long conference table as executives huddled around, sorting and selecting them. Dozens of officers had contacted the brigade, each hoping to secure the one-on-one match that would allow them to serve in the location of their choice. The brigade did not have time to interview each candidate. […]]]>

The pile of files and resumes covered the long conference table as executives huddled around, sorting and selecting them. Dozens of officers had contacted the brigade, each hoping to secure the one-on-one match that would allow them to serve in the location of their choice. The brigade did not have time to interview each candidate. Battalion commanders and brigade talent managers had the responsibility of sorting potential hires into a merit list order that would guide the brigade’s hiring decisions.

Once the hiring list was completed, the brigade human resources officer began making phone calls to offer one-on-one matches. Some officers agreed immediately; others had already joined other units; but most were evasive when offered a posting.

As days went by without a full hiring list, the brigade commander became more unsettled and decided to make hiring offers lower in the order of the merit list, picking up whoever signed up.

The Brigade eventually got matches for their slots, but at a cost. In the rush to hire quickly, none of the leaders noticed that they had compiled an order of merit list of officers who “looked exactly like them”. In other words, there was little diversity in order source and work experience, and zero ethnic and gender diversity.

Additionally, the brigade burned its reputation with a large cohort of candidate officers who felt there was no transparency in the hiring process. Applicants never had the opportunity to speak personally with a unit leader, or how competitive they were, what the brigade was looking for when it came to hiring, or exactly when the brigade made its selections. Consequently, few officers decided to take up the offers, with many officers sharing their poor interaction with peers and on social media.

Adopt a new approach

Unfortunately, the above story is similar to what happened in the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, during the last officer hire cycle. The “Raider Brigade” failed to develop a hiring strategy before the cycle, rushed to assess interested officers, fell behind in hiring and ended up recruiting a cohort of officers solid but slightly diversified. Our process lacked transparency and left too many agents wondering where they stood.

For the next hiring cycle and beyond, however, we are taking an entirely new approach. Here’s how.

We designed the Raider Brigade Talent Acquisition Process to formalize the Brigade’s hiring effort, provide transparency to interested officers, and promote diversity in our candidate pool. The Brigade Human Resources Officer and the Public Affairs Officer worked together to develop our model for acquiring the right talent, which follows these steps:

Step 1: Through social media, organizational leaders and referrals, we will invite officers to complete a questionnaire and provide documentation that will introduce them and show their intent to seek a position in the Raider Brigade. This process can begin well before the official hiring cycle begins, giving us the best chance to review files and engage with interested agents. During this stage, we will share unit products and key dates so agents know what to expect during the hiring process.

2nd step: Our Talent Managers (specially selected leaders who represent particular industries and positions) will review applications and compile a list of the most competitive candidates, updating the list as new leaders show interest.

Step 3: Talent managers will conduct interviews with the most competitive officers, allowing them to offer perspective on what it’s like to serve in the Raider Brigade as well as answer candidate questions.

Step 4: The talent managers will finalize an order of merit based on the files and interviews.

Step 5: Battalion commanders will apply their individual perspective and experience to the merit list order and make recommendations based on each candidate’s strength and potential contribution to the brigade.

Step 6: Battalion Commanders will then work together to finalize the Order of Merit list and present it to the Brigade Commander for approval.

Step 7: After deliberation with battalion commanders and key non-commissioned officers and staff, the brigade commander will validate that the proposed list meets the hiring needs of the brigade.

Step 8: Finally, the Brigade Commander and Talent Managers will schedule phone calls to offer positions in the Raider Brigade.

In the spirit of transparency, we will notify candidates when we receive their initial documentation and when we decide to hire them. Additionally, we know it can be frustrating to approach the end of the hiring cycle and not know if a unit has filled its positions. Therefore, we will make early hiring decisions and then notify all applicants when we are no longer hiring. This will allow agents to move down their preference list in a timely manner. After the cycle, we will also be asking for feedback so that we can improve our process in the future.

New lieutenants assigned to the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division receive a briefing at the ‘Raider Brigade’ headquarters at Fort Carson, Colorado. (Credit: US Army)

Diversity takes work

As mentioned earlier, it is important for us to create diversity in our pool of candidates. The “Army People Strategy” defines diversity as “all attributes, experiences, cultures, characteristics and origins of total force that reflect the nation we serve and enable the Army to deploy, fight and to win “.

In the Raider Brigade, we know that the strength of our team comes not only from our skills, knowledge and behaviors, but also from the diversity of backgrounds, perspectives and experiences that we bring with us. It is from these distinct perspectives that we are able to create new solutions to solve organizational challenges. We believe we will be a stronger, more effective team – and a more ready force – when we have broad representation among our leaders.

To achieve this, we must have a diverse candidate pool. The Raider Brigade’s talent acquisition process allows for this. Likewise, we will intentionally pursue talented officers who come from diverse backgrounds. As we saw in the last hiring cycle, diversity will not happen by default. It takes work.

A stronger team

If you are interested in serving with the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team at Fort Carson, Colorado, you can begin your application process by emailing us at [email protected] Even if you’re not in your movement window yet, we’d love to hear from you.

Please feel free to share our email and this article with your friends, peers and social media network so that more officers can learn how they can serve with us.

* * *

Col Andrew Steadman is commander of the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, which is deployed in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, Erbil Air Base, Iraq. Previously, he served as an Infantry Branch Assignment Officer at the United States Army Human Resources Command.

Major Erik Larson is the brigade human resources officer for the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team.

Major Kristoffer Sibbaluca is the public affairs officer for the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team.

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Organizational culture and talent management will witness a paradigm shift in Asia through 2022 — People Matters https://orsatti.info/organizational-culture-and-talent-management-will-witness-a-paradigm-shift-in-asia-through-2022-people-matters/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://orsatti.info/organizational-culture-and-talent-management-will-witness-a-paradigm-shift-in-asia-through-2022-people-matters/ The global disruption caused by the ongoing pandemic and social unrest in parts of Asia over the past two years has resulted in an unprecedented shift in how, when and where people work. It has also caused many people to think about their motivations at work, their values, and how best to balance their professional […]]]>

The global disruption caused by the ongoing pandemic and social unrest in parts of Asia over the past two years has resulted in an unprecedented shift in how, when and where people work. It has also caused many people to think about their motivations at work, their values, and how best to balance their professional and personal commitments. For most organizations, this has created great challenges in managing their employee expectations, as it has also changed the way many people think, feel and engage within their organization. It’s Talent Uprising, ushering in an era in which employees began to have heightened expectations for flexibility, leadership, culture, purpose, diversity and inclusiveness.

As many companies go through exponential changes in digital transformation, hybrid working, reskilling and upskilling, they also have a unique opportunity to transform in response to this paradigm shift of power, in which employees now wield their influence to redefine and shape their future of work.

“Talent Uprising” is an opportunity

This “talent revolt” presents a unique opportunity for organizations on many fronts. Many quickly transitioned to a remote work environment early in the pandemic, proving that employees don’t always have to be “in the office” to get their jobs done. This has opened the door for organizations to recruit top talent beyond traditional locations, and not limit the limits of their search to those who may reside nearby or are willing to relocate.

It also provided the opportunity to create meaningful changes in workplace culture at an accelerated pace. As business strategy continues to adapt, the organizational culture must also adapt, which is critical to enabling its successful execution. This gives leaders the opportunity to reorient their organization around an ideal leader-led culture, reinforced at every stage of the employee lifecycle and made possible by the support of excellent human resources.

Embrace the future of work

I believe there are important lessons to be learned from the last 24 months of the pandemic. Leaders are now expected to facilitate a degree of choice and empowerment over how, when, and where their people and teams work to achieve the results for which they are accountable. This will require continuous periods of experimentation, trial and error, adaptability and agility. Inflexible and rigid approaches that are reintroduced simply because they worked well “before the pandemic” run a high risk of disengaging people and not meeting their current needs, values ​​and expectations.

An aligned organizational culture, delivered by inspiring and engaging leaders, and supported by talent management practices that deliver a world-class employee experience, is essential to guiding people through these difficult times and transforming the risk of a great resignation” into opportunity. to gain a competitive advantage by attracting and retaining top talent.

Practical ways leaders can make this happen within their organization include:

  1. Organizations intending to create the culture necessary to drive their business forward — Strategy aligned with strategy, executed by leaders, and supported by talent programs that work for the business and its people.
  2. Increased focus on caring and engaging leadership. Developing relationships that unlock people’s potential while balancing business needs remains a key focus area. As the pandemic continues, more emphasis needs to be placed on leadership that demonstrates trust, authenticity, care and concern for employees.
  3. Leverage innovation to develop leadership talent in a remote or hybrid environment. With pandemic-related restrictions limiting the ability to bring people back to traditional face-to-face learning, organizations should look to leverage new tools, technologies and practices to accelerate the development of required leadership capabilities. Coaching and mentoring remain more important than ever.
  4. DE&I is becoming critically important to recruitment and retention efforts as well as the employee experience. Countless studies have demonstrated the impact of diversity and inclusiveness on business performance, customer experience, innovation, and a range of other critical outcomes. People need to be comfortable investing fully in their work.
  5. Listening and responding to employees is even more critical than before. Now more than ever, leaders need to actively listen to their employees’ experience and demonstrate a high level of commitment to act on that feedback. This means asking the right questions to the right people, at the right time, which may require adjustments to the frequency of your employee surveys.

The main focus for organizations and leaders is to work on lessons learned over the past two years of the pandemic, to understand what worked well, what could be improved, and how people’s motivations and expectations are changing. . It is also essential to look into new ways of working and not have the illusion that things will go back to the way they were.

Employees want to be heard and it would be unwise for leaders not to facilitate some degree of choice and empowerment over how their employees achieve results.

There is a substantial competitive advantage to be gained by organizations that most effectively realign their culture to enable business strategy and transform their talent management practices enabling new ways of working. Now is the time to seize this competitive opportunity.

Read the full story

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As 2022 approaches, Team One doubles down on talent management and employee growth with two senior promotions https://orsatti.info/as-2022-approaches-team-one-doubles-down-on-talent-management-and-employee-growth-with-two-senior-promotions/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://orsatti.info/as-2022-approaches-team-one-doubles-down-on-talent-management-and-employee-growth-with-two-senior-promotions/ LOS ANGELES, Dec. 17 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Team One, Publicis Groupe’s fully integrated media, digital and communications agency for premium brands, today announced the promotion of two senior executives who will help strengthen the company’s engagement. agency towards its employees and talents. Team One promoted Susanna Leighton to executive director of resource management and […]]]>

LOS ANGELES, Dec. 17 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Team One, Publicis Groupe’s fully integrated media, digital and communications agency for premium brands, today announced the promotion of two senior executives who will help strengthen the company’s engagement. agency towards its employees and talents. Team One promoted Susanna Leighton to executive director of resource management and operations, a new position for the agency, and Amy Small to executive director of talent.

“As we head into a new year and set our priorities for 2022, our people and the important work they do continues to be at the top of the list,” said Julie Michael, CEO of Team One. “In the midst of this great workforce shake-up happening in the marketing industry, we aim to turn the tide to ensure we have the most passionate workforce in the industry in doubling down on recruiting the brightest talent, while challenging and unleashing our current teams.To launch remarkable ideas into the world, a commitment to talent and resources is more important than ever right now, and Susanna and Amy are the perfect people to help guide our efforts here.

Leighton, who has been with Team One for 14 years, was previously the agency’s Director of Resource Planning and Talent Management. In her new role, she will amplify and distribute agency talent, overseeing people analytics, leading annual client scoping processes, managing key agency financial metrics, championing advancement employees and cross-team opportunities.

“I am constantly inspired by our people, their intelligence, their creativity, their collaboration and their entrepreneurial spirit, all in service of our creative product and our clients’ business. I very much look forward to taking on this new role and partnering with key Team One leaders to strategize and implement new staffing models, identify growth opportunities for talent, and continue to build cross-functional teams. prosperous,” remarked Leighton.

With the promotion of Amy Small, Team One will strive to create a more centralized team that will provide support, resources, direction and inspiration to its employees at all stages of their career growth. In his new role, Small’s oversight will extend from recruiting to a broader human resources and talent acquisition framework.

Since joining Team One in 2012, Small has helped the agency’s talent recruitment process in her previous roles as Associate Director of Talent and most recently Director of Talent. “I am truly delighted to join the Team One leadership team and hope that my presence will continue to put talent at the forefront of our thinking, knowing that our people are our greatest currency. Team One in our industry is very specific and unique, and attracts so much talent, and I’m thrilled to have the opportunity to bring new and innovative programs into the mix,” said Small.

Both Leighton and Small will report to agency CEO Julie Michael.

About Team 1

Team One is Publicis Groupe’s fully integrated media, digital and communications agency, dedicated to helping premium brands thrive in the modern media landscape. With 450 employees, Team One has six North American offices, including headquarters in Los Angeles, Dallas, New York, Chicago, Atlanta and Boise. Team One customers include Lexus and the Lexus Dealer Association, The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, W Hotels, Marriott International, Ste. Michelle Wine Estates, Harman International, Wisk, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, HP Inc., Sparklight and Cathay Pacific. Named to Fast Company’s 2021 list of Best Workplaces for Innovators, Team One continues to be recognized for its unique culture that encourages innovation at all levels. To learn more about the agency’s work, team, and innovative spirit, visit TeamOne-USA.com.

Press contacts:

Melanie Capruso
Di Gennaro Communications
Melanie.capruso@digennaro-usa.com

A photo accompanying this ad is available at https://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/f653d546-7054-4044-a04d-41d5a160723f

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4 healthcare talent management trends to watch from the AHA https://orsatti.info/4-healthcare-talent-management-trends-to-watch-from-the-aha/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://orsatti.info/4-healthcare-talent-management-trends-to-watch-from-the-aha/ To help hospitals and healthcare systems address workforce challenges, the American Hospital Association has published an overview of talent management trends and strategies in healthcare. The report, released in November, provides an overview of trends affecting health care human resources, as well as insights and information about the workforce. For the report, the American Hospital […]]]>

To help hospitals and healthcare systems address workforce challenges, the American Hospital Association has published an overview of talent management trends and strategies in healthcare.

The report, released in November, provides an overview of trends affecting health care human resources, as well as insights and information about the workforce.

For the report, the American Hospital Association reviewed dozens of reports, studies, and other data sources from leading health organizations and researchers.

According to the report, four trends in talent management in healthcare are worth watching:

1. The lingering financial effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. A Nov. 30 report from a health care consulting firm Kaufman Room found that hospitals and healthcare systems experienced a second consecutive month of declining margins as labor spending increased. A separate report conducted by Kaufman Hall for the American Hospital Association also found that median hospital margins could be 11% lower than pre-pandemic levels by the end of 2021 due to higher costs of caring for sicker patients and the fewer outpatient visits than before the pandemic.

2. The future of mental health care will not look like it used to. The American Hospital Association’s Workforce Report noted that the pandemic has highlighted the need for better access to mental health services, but has also caused healthcare organizations to evolve their remote care platforms to improve access to mental health care. “In the future, scientific advances and understanding of the brain, as well as cultural changes, will likely reduce the stigma associated with behavioral health,” the report said. “At the same time, increased access to behavioral health service utilization data combined with the use of artificial intelligence will increase the ability to predict the likelihood of mental illness or addiction and offer preventative measures. “

3. Diversity, equity and inclusion as a top priority. Many health care organizations are focused on addressing racial disparities in health care and ensuring that they provide equitable services. To achieve their diversity, equity and inclusion goals, the American Hospital Association has stated that healthcare organizations must develop effective leadership diversity strategies and ensure that their boards, executives and their workforces are diverse in terms of race, ethnic origin, age, gender, sexual orientation, skills. sets, thinking and abilities.

4. The role that the widespread adoption of telemedicine will play in new models of care. Patients have increasingly tried telehealth during the pandemic as they seek to receive medical services safely. In a July 9 report, McKinsey & Co. found that overall telehealth use for office visits and outpatient care in April 2020 was 78 times higher than in February 2020. McKinsey & Co. also valued that up to $250 billion in US healthcare spending could potentially shift to virtual or virtually enabled care. The American Hospital Association said healthcare organizations will need to analyze and rethink several components of care, including workflows, patient interactions, training future clinicians and retraining current ones.

To access the full report from the American Hospital Association, Click here.

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A case for more data-driven talent management https://orsatti.info/a-case-for-more-data-driven-talent-management/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://orsatti.info/a-case-for-more-data-driven-talent-management/ Employees are a company’s number one asset and we generally tend to undervalue them. The sustainability of an organization depends on the retention of its best employees and their motivation and satisfaction. To achieve this, a data-driven approach is to use People Analytics. People analysis collects and applies data to improve critical talent and business […]]]>

Employees are a company’s number one asset and we generally tend to undervalue them. The sustainability of an organization depends on the retention of its best employees and their motivation and satisfaction. To achieve this, a data-driven approach is to use People Analytics. People analysis collects and applies data to improve critical talent and business results. This enables HR leaders to develop data-driven insights to inform talent decisions, improve workforce processes, and promote positive employee experiences.

A McKinsey & Company The survey found an 80% increase in recruiting effectiveness and a 50% reduction in attrition rates across organizations that used people analytics. Organizations have also seen a 25% increase in business productivity.

This data-driven decision-making uses analytical, statistical, data science, data visualization, and machine learning techniques. Analytics in HR enables more strategic, data-driven decisions throughout the employee lifecycle. It enables better hiring decisions as well as effective management of employee retention.

A clear transition from prescriptive to predictive analytics enables organizations to deal effectively with the dynamism of their operating environment.

Different areas of people analysis

External labor market analysis

People analysis can help HR identify the appropriate labor market for different types of positions. This helps organizations determine employee salaries and how to position them within the company. It also helps them identify analytical and data science market trends and how organizations can participate in them. Finally, external labor market analysis helps to understand labor needs.

Workforce planning

Workforce planning is about creating a process to identify the team members and talents required by the organization to achieve its business goals and objectives. Workforce planning takes into account current and future needs as well as succession planning. Responsibilities of the workforce planning function include proactive forecasting – headcount, employees with the right skills, when to make changes, when to make certain decisions, and the optimal cost to enable them.

HR analysis

A well-implemented human resource analysis practice can provide a comprehensive view of the company’s employees. This helps business leaders and HR managers better understand their workforce. The human resources analysis function can play a transformational role. It can provide insights on critical issues such as – who is leaving, which function is prone to higher attrition, the gender and salary gap, how can I improve internal mobility.

Compensation analysis

Compensation analysis focuses on optimizing labor cost to promote the development of results. It’s a great way for companies to grow as an employer brand that effectively communicates an attractive value proposition to employees. This helps in comparing salaries to understand where candidates stand against their peers and the market salary for similar positions. It also leads to equal pay and helps leaders track their business goals and determine if the Total Rewards program is meeting its goals.

Role of AI/ML in People Analytics

The idea of ​​using data to understand and solve employee problems is not new. As described above, external talent market analysis, workforce planning, human resource analysis, and compensation analysis attempt to gather information about people. What has changed now is our ability to look at historical data holistically and generate predictive insights that accurately capture employee behavior.

The first phenomenon that fueled the use of AI/ML in HR is big data. Traditional HR information systems favored the capture of structured information such as – attributes that the candidate entered during the application process, employee compensation and rank, current and previous salary changes, etc. Data analysts then generate descriptive analyzes from this structured data. With the commercialization of Big Data and NoSQL technologies, it has become easier and more accessible for technologists to store unstructured and semi-structured information such as resumes, job descriptions, survey results, etc. This means HR has convenient access to information-rich information. new datasets.

The second driver of the increased adaptation of AI to HR is the precipitous interest of industry leaders. Business leaders have witnessed the transformative power of AI in other business functions such as sales, marketing, and supply chain. These encouraging results from previously implemented AI projects fostered an environment that helped HR teams experiment with AI to solve their employees’ challenges.

To strengthen the capabilities of AI to solve HR problems, we will discuss a few use cases.

Retention:

A well-designed strategy for retaining the best employees is essential to the continued success of any organization. There are many reasons why companies strive to retain top performers; a Gallup survey pointed out that the cost of replacing an employee can range from half to twice the employee’s annual salary. In addition, a permanent employee embodies the culture, key values ​​and relationships of the company. Apart from increasing the cost of replacing an employee, it also slows down the progress of a business.

A successful strategy must understand the attributes and conditions that contribute to employee attrition. AI and ML techniques can help organizations understand the latent variables at play, contributing to employee departures from the business. AI enables the organization to understand direct and indirect employee feedback signals and manage workplace issues. ML algorithms with good inference capabilities can help companies understand the exact factors or combination of factors driving attrition and can even help leaders organize trends by business unit, job category , employment level, etc.

Partner feeling:

Organizations conduct several surveys to better understand their workforce. Each survey has a different focus and attempts to understand different perspectives. Satisfaction surveys, engagement surveys, culture surveys, 360 degree feedback and exit surveys are some of the established surveys we come across in organizations. Almost all of these surveys ask employees a few questions and offer predefined options. They also have a text box, usually at the end, to allow comments to be made. Survey options selected by associates can serve as appropriate input variables for border ML experiments. For example, unfavorable responses defined by associates can be incorporated as inputs to ML models for the purpose of modeling churn. Natural language processing (NLP), a subfield of AI, can also understand and summarize associate sentiment from raw text. Techniques such as “topic modeling” and text summarization can help organizations understand the topics of discussion among associates. These identified themes can then be analyzed in context to develop strategic initiatives to assist associates.

Recruitment and talent management:

Identifying top talent is critical to the success of any organization. ML/AI techniques can be used in the recruitment process to scan, read and assess candidates. This process can be used to mimic the recruiter’s first screening pass. The idea behind AI-assisted recruitment is not to replace the human touch in recruitment, but to help the recruiter quickly identify the key characteristics that the candidate possesses. NLP can be used to summarize the skills of an organization, and this knowledge can be used effectively to understand the skills of the future.

The importance of human intervention

AI for HR is not the same as AI for self-driving cars or AI for products. AI, or any other technological innovation for that matter, should not be used to replace “the human” in the HR function. Although AI-based systems are remarkably successful in uncovering the latest trends, it is important to note that the insights generated are only as good as the data. Biased AI-based recruitment systems have in the past resulted in sexist decision-making processes. HR should ensure that appropriate governance measures are in place to proactively understand decisions made by AI systems.

This article is written by a member of the AIM Leaders Council. AIM Leaders Council is an invitation-only forum of senior executives from the data science and analytics industry. To check if you are eligible for membership, please complete the form here.

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Snows will roll out a new company-wide talent management program in 2022 https://orsatti.info/snows-will-roll-out-a-new-company-wide-talent-management-program-in-2022/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://orsatti.info/snows-will-roll-out-a-new-company-wide-talent-management-program-in-2022/ Snows Motor Group is rolling out a new company-wide talent management program as part of its 60th anniversary celebrations. AM100 car retail group HR department launched a group-wide onboarding program two years ago, which created a shared onboarding experience for onboarding employees at all levels, he said. The new employee-led talent management program also runs […]]]>

Snows Motor Group is rolling out a new company-wide talent management program as part of its 60th anniversary celebrations.

AM100 car retail group HR department launched a group-wide onboarding program two years ago, which created a shared onboarding experience for onboarding employees at all levels, he said.

The new employee-led talent management program also runs from the point of hire and provides staff with regular, comprehensive feedback on their contribution to the business and clear, managed pathways to develop and advance their career.

Katie Snow, Snows’ Director of Development, worked with the Human Resources department to develop the program. She said: “The business has had a huge period of expansion in recent years and more recently of course we have had a global pandemic.

“Like all businesses, we have diversified and adapted, especially online. But it is essential that all employees, new and established, can see the impact of their contribution now and in the future and are able to grow and reach their full potential.

As part of this program, annual talent review meetings allow staff to measure themselves against Snows behaviors and metrics, chart their own personal development, the extent to which they have helped the company achieve its standards and if it can improve.

“The program not only enhances the development of our colleagues, it will also result in continuous improvement in all areas of our business,” Snow said.

Snows recently added a sixth Peugeot dealership to its franchise portfolio with the acquisition of Hamble Motors of Southampton.

The Southampton-based group – whose chief executive, Stephen Snow, was featured in AM magazine a year ago – became one of the main UK retail partners for Stellantis-owned brands with the conclusion of the deal. business purchase on Bursledon Road, Southampton .

Although the first lockdown may have closed Snows forecourts for a time, the company said it helped facilitate the first rounds of the new program.

Snow added: “During the pandemic, we have been able to shape the framework, while our steering group and business managers have had their first trainings.

“From its initial development to its ongoing rollout, it has been important for us to maintain the momentum and enthusiasm of the project.

“The most senior executives also participated in the first phase of the deployment, doing their own talent assessment meetings and we are now continuing with a cascade effect in the workforce.

“The program will continue to evolve over time with regular feedback from our colleagues.

“The response so far has been very positive and we look forward to entering the second phase of the program in February 2022.”

Snows represents 18 manufacturer brands through 50 franchised dealerships and has three authorized service centers, 12 multi-franchise used car centers and a stand-alone accident repair center in the South, employing a total of 937 people.

The company was named the top UK retailer for online reputation in the 2021 Automotive Reputation Report last month.

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Snows rolls out a talent management program for all staff https://orsatti.info/snows-rolls-out-a-talent-management-program-for-all-staff/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://orsatti.info/snows-rolls-out-a-talent-management-program-for-all-staff/ Snows Motor Group is rolling out a new company-wide talent management program. The group launched a group-wide onboarding program two years ago, which created a shared onboarding experience for onboarding employees at all levels. The new employee-led talent management program also runs from the point of hire and gives employees feedback on their contribution to […]]]>

Snows Motor Group is rolling out a new company-wide talent management program.

The group launched a group-wide onboarding program two years ago, which created a shared onboarding experience for onboarding employees at all levels.

The new employee-led talent management program also runs from the point of hire and gives employees feedback on their contribution to the business and clear, managed pathways to develop and advance their career.

Katie Snow, Snows’ Director of Development, worked with the Human Resources department to develop the program.

She said: “The business has had a huge period of expansion in recent years and more recently of course we have had a global pandemic.

“Like all businesses, we have diversified and adapted, especially online.

“But it’s essential that all employees, new and established, can see the impact of their contribution now and in the future and are able to grow and reach their full potential.”

As part of this program, annual talent review meetings allow staff to measure themselves against Snows behaviors and metrics, chart their own personal development, the extent to which they have helped the company achieve its standards and whether it can be improved.

“The program not only enhances the development of our colleagues, it will also result in continuous improvement in all areas of our business,” Snows said.

While the first lockdown may have closed Snows forecourts for a while, Covid actually aid facilitate the first rounds of the new program.

“During the pandemic, we were able to shape the framework, while our steering group and sales managers went through their first training courses,” Katie explained.

“From its initial development to its ongoing rollout, it has been important for us to maintain the momentum and enthusiasm of the project.

“The most experienced executives also participated in the first phase of the rollout, undergoing their own talent review meetings and we are now continuing with a cascading effect through the workforce,” she said. .

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Army ROTC Embraces Cadet Preferences in New Talent Management Campaign https://orsatti.info/army-rotc-embraces-cadet-preferences-in-new-talent-management-campaign/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://orsatti.info/army-rotc-embraces-cadet-preferences-in-new-talent-management-campaign/ WASHINGTON — The Army is embarking on a massive effort to improve how it manages talent across the force. And the service’s leading source of officers implements these principles at the very beginning of an officer’s career – before it even begins. Army Cadet Command’s Reserve Officer Training Corps produces the majority of the service’s […]]]>

WASHINGTON — The Army is embarking on a massive effort to improve how it manages talent across the force. And the service’s leading source of officers implements these principles at the very beginning of an officer’s career – before it even begins.

Army Cadet Command’s Reserve Officer Training Corps produces the majority of the service’s officers.

Until recently, the primary consideration when assigning junior lieutenants to one of the 17 base branches of the military was the nebulous “needs of the military,” along with an order of merit that ranked each cadet who was competing for an active duty commission.

“Being an ROTC grad myself…which I went through years ago [was] really driven by the needs of the military,” Maj. Gen. Johnny Davis told Army Times at the Association of the U.S. Army’s annual meeting on Tuesday morning.

Davis took command of Cadet Command based at Fort Knox, Kentucky, in August and sat down for a one-on-one interview.

“What’s very different is that it’s, I believe, more seamless than ever…compared to how I went through the branching sequence [more than] 30 years ago,” the general added.

Now, the branching process takes into account the skills, talents and preferences of the cadets. The process includes a new web portal where cadets take a talent assessment exam, find out which talents each branch is looking for, and submit their resumes and preferred branches.

A key part of the new initiative, Davis explained, was a concerted effort to educate cadets on the importance of taking talent assessments seriously and spending time learning about branches.

“[Cadets] need to be more transparent…[they] have to be part of that process,” Davis said. “Or, we can potentially have superstars landing in a branch that isn’t one of their favorite branches…keep[ing] this talent is going to be more difficult if it’s not one of the branches they want to land in.

For the first time, cadets are conducting branch interviews via videoconference, which will allow them and representatives from different branches to assess their mutual fit.

“Some have interviewed 15 agencies; other interviewees [only] two or three,” Davis noted. “It gives you the opportunity to educate yourself, and we’ve opened the doors to allow that to happen.”

Davis believes that improving the talent management process and finding mutual matches between cadets and the position they will hold as officers will increase the quality, morale and retention of junior leaders overall. of the force.

“Once you land the right job, all the other things start to fall into place throughout your military career,” Davis said. “It’s a good thing for the force, and I think it’s a good way to retain talent and then continue to manage that talent throughout a successful career.”

Results from the first round of talent-based offshoots will be released soon, Davis said.

Davis Winkie is a staff reporter covering the military. He originally joined Military Times as a reporting intern in 2020. Prior to journalism, Davis worked as a military historian. He is also a human resources officer in the Army National Guard.

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Averbbook: Talent is the answer, not talent management https://orsatti.info/averbbook-talent-is-the-answer-not-talent-management/ Thu, 30 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://orsatti.info/averbbook-talent-is-the-answer-not-talent-management/ Human resources rely on technology to solve their employees’ problems and challenges, but often at the expense of the very employees they are trying to serve. That was one of the main messages – and warnings – from Jason Averbook on Thursday during the day’s closing speech at the HR Tech Conference. In a high-profile […]]]>

Human resources rely on technology to solve their employees’ problems and challenges, but often at the expense of the very employees they are trying to serve.

That was one of the main messages – and warnings – from Jason Averbook on Thursday during the day’s closing speech at the HR Tech Conference. In a high-profile speech titled “After 18 Months of Disruption: Reimagining Organizational Purpose for the Future,” the LeapGen co-founder and CEO and HRE columnist said HR needs to focus on people, not the technology they are looking for.

After coping with the COVID-19 pandemic over the past 20 months, the hybrid workforce and employees quitting their jobs in droves, Averbour asked attendees to text their current feelings for an online poll in which HRGreen meant “happy”, HRYellow meant “so much”, and HRRed was reserved for “feeling bad”. The audience results were approximately 40% HRGreen, 55% HRYellow and 5% HRRed.

“We’re at the high end of ‘eh’,” he said. “These are the most important questions we in HR can ask the workforce: how are you and how are you living your day?”

Averbook said asking employees how they are doing doesn’t have to imply a rating or an engagement score. “Why does this matter? We are humans,” he said. “We have moved from living outside of work to living inside of work and into our lives.”

Averbook added: “We place far too much weight on technology in a world where we need to understand how people feel.”

Technology can’t do much. “We spent $8 billion to make our lives easier in HR. What have we done to make life easier for our employees? »

Averbook cited research that technology projects in 2019 were often far from the finish line and rarely part of the winner’s circle. Of 700 HR technology projects completed in 2019, 15% met goals, 22% were on budget, 19% met deadlines and 11% improved the employee experience, he said.

“We need to stop implementing technology as the answer to everything, and we need to start deploying human capabilities,” he said.

“We have to ask ourselves questions, [like] “What do we want to be better at now? Don’t use the data from 2018 which indicates that we encountered a huge obstacle in the road. We focus on the work now. What do you want to be good at and what [do you want] to agree? he said. “How do I want to improve? Recruitment, retention and diversity.

Averbook fiercely doubts the subject of people quitting their jobs in large numbers for the reasons cited by the experts.

“’The Big Resignation’ is the dumbest thing I’ve ever heard. People have understood what matters to them and you need to give them an emotional employee experience where they can feel human,” he said. “Otherwise they won’t work for you.”

“It’s not just about recruiting. If we scare people away…as fast as people come, that’s not good,” he said. “Talent is the answer, not talent management.”

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Epsilon’s Seema Padman — People Matters https://orsatti.info/epsilons-seema-padman-people-matters/ Mon, 13 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://orsatti.info/epsilons-seema-padman-people-matters/ The pandemic has raised a significant challenge for talent management. In the face of mass layoffs and resignations, a potential trust deficit between employers and employees, demands for flexibility, the urgency to close skills gaps, and changing business priorities, executives have had to devise new strategies to hire, develop and retain talent if they are […]]]>

The pandemic has raised a significant challenge for talent management. In the face of mass layoffs and resignations, a potential trust deficit between employers and employees, demands for flexibility, the urgency to close skills gaps, and changing business priorities, executives have had to devise new strategies to hire, develop and retain talent if they are to keep up with the rapid pace of digital transformation.

In an interview with People Matters, Seema Padman, Senior Vice President, Human Resources, Epsilon-India and APAC, shares her insights on talent trends impacting the world of HR and key areas of interest for leaders as they improve their employer branding and attract the best and the right talent.

Seema has worked in all areas of HR over a 20-year career in different industries and has held HR leadership positions regionally and globally. She is passionate about working with the business to design and implement innovative people, leadership and talent initiatives that bring value to Epsilon and its associates. She joined Epsilon as they were setting up the India office and partnered with a diverse set of stakeholders to grow and scale the Indian organization to over 2,500 associates.

Here are some excerpts from the interview:

The pandemic has raised a host of challenges for organizations around the world. What have been the biggest HR challenges and how has your company overcome them?

The initial phase was definitely about keeping things going. It was basically having to carry out all of our HR processes remotely, whether it was hiring or development. We had to really flip the switch, transform everything and manage everything, to continue our processes without too much disruption.

Once you’ve managed to do that, comes the bigger problem of how to stay connected within the organization, ensure employee engagement, and ensure the culture stays intact. We have led several initiatives to ensure all this, including investing in technology. For hiring, we used technologies that included video interviews and conducting online assessments. Our learning content has been moved to the virtual space where we have hosted stock market summits, hosted workshops and even led two-day development initiatives.

Epsilon’s culture is built on three pillars, which are to belong, grow and connect and these became the values ​​we relied on to ensure we were doing the right things by making sure people were heard, felt included and a sense of belonging was instilled.

Inclusion was also a big part of our initiatives. We also hired our Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion as we considered how to grow the organization and stay at a distance. In addition to communication, creating a sense of connection between employees and not forgetting what we needed to do as an organization were also our priority areas.

Since the future of any organization hinges on hiring the right people and nurturing them, what have been some of your biggest lessons in talent management?

The talent war isn’t going away with the escalation of The Great Resignation. Another key idea is that deepening the connection in the organization is really important, because so much of the interaction between people tends to be related to working in the virtual setup. In the office environment, there are a lot of informal contacts. And that informal connection and that sense of community is a very important aspect that has been underlined by the current situation.

When it comes to talent management, one of the underlying beliefs I have is that organizations should view it as an adult-to-adult relationship. Instead of telling people what to do, individuals need to take ownership of how they want to grow in the organization. We will provide the space as an enabling function, but the responsibility lies with the individual.

In light of the pandemic, employee expectations of their employers have changed dramatically. There is a demand for greater flexibility and D&I initiatives to encourage employee engagement and ensure employee well-being. What do you think about this?

Epsilon focused on improving gender diversity. We have implemented initiatives around well-being and flexibility even before the pandemic. Our employees had the option to work from home and we had flexible working hours. But with the pandemic, the emphasis on this has intensified and we have had to go back and re-evaluate what we originally offered. In terms of flexibility, organizations had no choice but to adapt to this practice. For us, it was about making sure that managers understood the personal situation of the individual and recognized that it was not the same for everyone. And having to deal with that was difficult.

Being attentive to the situation of employees was one of the characteristics of flexibility. Our organization’s leaders let people choose their own schedule and made sure they found a way to communicate and stay in touch.

We also had an employee assistance program — a confidential hotline that people could use. And our people used it. We also reminded people to tap into support networks and, to that end, set up sessions by counselors to educate managers on, for example, how to recognize signs of anxiety and how to deal with it because this is a new situation for everyone. We also had sessions with family members of employees on emotional and mental well-being.

One of our inclusion initiatives is called She Rises, which involves opening up positions to women who have taken career breaks.

Can you give us some examples and your thoughts on what the priority areas should be when it comes to improving the employer value proposition?

There are a lot of companies making their voices heard and getting noticed among that noise is really hard. But ensuring that the authentic voice of the organization is heard is most critical. As an organization, we are always aware that this must also reflect the lived reality of the person. Otherwise, in today’s era, it collapses. It may just become marketing hype and not reality. It’s a thing.

The second is how to make sure people know the industry we operate in, which is specific to Epsilon. How to ensure that specific aspects of your technology and platforms shine through and that individuals are aware of what the organization and its business is an important factor. The values ​​and behaviors that are essential to us, the way our customers see us, what we would like to emphasize and the company culture are important. Finally, authenticity is the most important thing when it comes to employer branding.

In this increasingly data-driven world, people analytics has been a key tool in overcoming the challenges posed by talent management. What is your opinion on the advantages that people analytics can offer in recruiting and developing talent?

I’m a big believer in people, technology and data analytics. And that fits our business. From an HR perspective, it’s really important to have great technology that captures the right data which is then turned into insights. We have created a function that examines reports; a dashboard that leverages data visualization tools like Tableau to present data from these reports to the business. There are metrics we track on an ongoing basis to see the effectiveness of what we are doing in HR.

Our Applicant Tracking System also leverages and publishes relevant data to track the type of diversity that is entering the organization and other demographics from the perspective of our talent. We also have a learning management system that captures all the learning initiatives we run as well as the participants and attendees, but we transform that by connecting it to results as well.

Finally, what do you think are some of the lessons HR and talent leaders need to keep in mind when planning for a successful organizational future?

I think remote work is easy. The hybrid is going to be all the more difficult as remote work makes it a very equal playing field for everyone.

Inclusion will become a big factor when we go hybrid because it’s very likely that not everyone will be back in the office and people, some might join immediately, others gradually, which means people who don’t may not come to the office immediately may feel they are losing information as well as communications with colleagues and leaders or involvement in ongoing projects. Managers really need to look at how they can have inclusive teams and how they can operate inclusively so that no one loses out just for not being in the office. There is something called proximity bias where more trust is given to those who are close and we need to be very aware of this.

The second thing is to create a sense of belonging for new team members. The third is to encourage a micro-culture of teams aligned with the macro-culture of the organization.

And, of course, I often feel like our people practices have been what we do in the offline world, all we’ve done is try to replicate that in the virtual world. So we have to change that, we have to be deliberate about our human practices, unlearn some of them and adopt new strategies.

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